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LEED Information


Information on LEED CERTIFICATION

LEED® is an acronym for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. It is a program developed by the US Green Buildings Council (USGBC) and has gained widespread support in the commercial and institutional marketplace. For more information on the USGBC, you may want to visit their Internet web site @ www.usgbc.org. The purpose of this informational sheet is to overview the LEED® program and identify areas where Epic Stone Works products can support a building project’s effort to obtain LEED® Certification.

In October 2005, the USGBC published the latest Version 2.2 of their LEED® Program. LEED® can be applied to every building type and phase of a building lifecycle. Specific programs exist for the following types of projects: New commercial construction and major renovation projects; Existing building operations and maintenance; Commercial interiors projects; Core and shell development projects; Homes; and Neighborhood Development.

Inquiries as to how Epic Stone Works products can help a project’s efforts to obtain certification are usually for new construction of commercial, institutional, and high-rise residential buildings. In this program, a qualifying project can receive LEED® Certification in four different levels depending on how many "points" they achieve. In the latest Version 2.2 LEED® Survey, there are six separate categories encompassing a total of 69 possible points.

 

Innovation & Design Process -

5 points

Sustainable Sites -

14 points

Water Efficiency -

5 points

Energy and Atmosphere -

17 points

Materials and Resources -

13 points

Indoor Environmental Quality -

15 points

 

The four-certification levels are:

Certified

26 - 32

 

Silver

33 - 38

 

Gold

39 - 51

 

Platinum

52 +


The areas where LCRS, as a supplier of natural stone, can directly impact the project’s point total, is in the categories of Materials & Resources and in some cases Energy & Atmosphere. More specifically, there are potentially anywhere from one to six points available based on (1) the volume of recycled material content and (2) the location where the product is manufactured (i.e. proximity to construction site). The LEED® credit points most applicable to our products are as follows.

 

Materials & Resources

M&R Credit 4.1 (1 point)   Use materials with recycled content such that the sum of post- consumer recycled content plus one-half of the pre-consumer content constitutes at least 10% (based on cost) of the total value of the materials in the project.

M&R Credit 4.2 (1 point)   Use materials with recycled content such that the sum of post- consumer recycled content plus one-half of the pre-consumer content constitutes an additional 10% beyond MR Credit 4.1 (total of 20%, based on cost) of the total value of the materials in the project.

M&R Credit 5.1 (1 point)   Use building materials or products that have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured, within 500 miles of the project site for a minimum of 10% (based on cost) of the total materials value. If only a fraction of a product or material is extracted/harvested/recovered and manufactured locally, then only that percentage (by weight) shall contribute to the regional value.

M&R Credit 5.2 (1 point)   Use building materials or products that have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured, within 500 miles of the project site for an additional 10% beyond MR Credit 5.1 (total of 20%, based on cost) of the total materials value. If only a fraction of the material is extracted, harvested, recovered and/or manufactured locally, then only that percentage (by weight) shall contribute to the regional value.

The LEED® 2.2 Manual provides more specific guidance regarding the definition for "Pre-Consumer" recycled materials. The Manual states that “Recycled content shall be defined in accordance with the International Organization of Standards document, ISO 14021—Environmental labels and declarations—Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labeling).

“Post-consumer material is defined as waste material generated by households or by commercial, industrial and institutional facilities in their role as end-users of the product, which can no longer be used for its intended purpose”. A good example is an aluminum beverage can. “Pre-consumer material is defined as material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.”

Specifications and requests for environmentally friendly products are expected to continue their rapid increase. After an initial flurry of interest in the late 80's and early 90's, there was a drop in interest during the period 1995 - 1999. However, the advent of the USGBC’s LEED® program and other organizations (ANSI, ASTM, and ISO) has resulted in a renewed emphasis on "green buildings". Further, there are a growing number of government entities that have placed requirements that new public and/or commercial construction be LEED® certified.

Over the last few years, LCRS has received many inquiries about the environmentally friendly nature of our products and processes. LCRS’s products contain varying amounts of recycled materials depending on the manufacturing location. Information on the specific recycled materials content can be provided upon request. Please note that the LEED® criterion is such that a recycled materials content of any percentage will help the project obtain the recycled materials credit.

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